Tag Archives: Utah

Mortigi Tempo — Spread The Disease

Mortigi Tempo
Spread The Disease
Self-Released
August 23rd, 2018

Mortigi Tempo produced something delightfully refreshing and different with their new album. It’s called Spread The Disease. After a pint it’s the kind of music that leaves an infectiously subversive impression. Stylistically, Mortigi Temp seem to touch a kind of indie-rock twirling with elements of industrial influencing post punk that somehow mixes into a gothic feeling ensemble. To be sure, it’s the sort of music that celebrates the ominous while invoking a surrender to move about like an idiot after too manic inducing substances.

Spread The Disease firmly grabs a hold of it’s listener and electrifies them to dance. This is evident within only listening to the first few seconds of the first track “Spread The Disease.”  This song starts off with an intro featuring a politically charged PSA on the dangers of complacent boredom courtesy of a prerecorded reading of Wallace Shawn’s “My Dinner With Andre.” It’s dark and warms up for a wild post punky ride of a tune with a strong back beat and erry synth. Think of Love and Rockets with a dash of Killing Joke infused with HMLTD.

The entirety of Spread The Disease is like a wild ride. “Chrome Plated Cookies” breaks off the previous tracks path into the realm of something groovy and indie. While “Jesse Wants To Steal” breaks into a sound invoking nostalgia for early noughties alternative rock.

Further down the track listing each additional tune comes across with a stark difference from that of before. By the end, this albums concluding track “Aftermath” leaves one feeling a bit empty inside—not unlike the commercial driven culture that the first track warns against.   

From start to finish Spread The Disease is brilliant. It pulls it’s listener through the depths of being warned against a rampant self-contented culture. It it is done so in a superbly entertaining way and performed with music that begins by begging one to dance and then to gradually succumb to the mind numbing effects of sounds found in droning of Neo-psychedelia.  

MortigiTempo have a unique talent and they superbly demonstrate it through a diversity in style that truly shows offs the majesty of their skill. As a whole Spread The Disease is well worth the listen and it’ll be interesting to see what MortigiTempo comes out with next. Be sure to watch them closely.

Rebel Rebel — The Gospel Truth

Rebel Rebel
The Gospel Truth
Self-Released
Street: 07.24.2017

At last Rebel Rebel have released their EP The Gospel Truth. This record superbly reveals a sound that infuses the infectious, yet, bubbly nature of indie rock with the attitude of ’70s CBGB punk inspired glam. In other words, think of Rebel Rebel channeling Franz Ferdinand taking cues from Lou Reed who in turn just watched a set played by Talking Heads or The Revelons.

Rebel Rebel are unique act to catch. They don’t boast a heavily overused punk style, but rather come into their own without relying on clichés. Furthermore, these cats they have always remained sincere and humble and it shows with this record.

Their EP is good and has some killer tracks. Most notable are the “The Gospel Truth” and “Jen Puked.” “The Gospel Truth” is fast and punchy. After immediately switching this on and I’m hooked by the in-your face sound. It’s a whirlwind of a song that makes me want to jump about like an idiot who recently discovered the dealing power of sugar and caffeine.

“Jen Puked” follows in this vein. It’s a track with a killer drum beat building up into a wild punky tune that is vibrant with electric energy. This song shows off a defiant passion lead by vocalist Mason Keller Comstock and it perfectly blends punk and indie into a fast and snotty wallop.

I recommend checking this EP out. The Gospel Truth is a fun listen that highlights Rebel Rebel’s maturing sound. I’m interested to see where they go from here and if this record reveals anything, I’m sure what they have next will be worth a listen. So pay attention.

For more about Salt Lake City’s Rebel Rebel, check out their bandcamp and give their Facebook Page a like. 

Salt Lake’s Anti-Racist Solidarity Rally

Photo: Mike Jones

In response to the protests on Saturday August 11 in Charlottesville, Virginia, the League of Native American Voters organized a rally against racism at the Salt Lake City and County Building. Around 2000 protesters attended. Whole many groups participated—such as Antifa, Black Lives Matter, Democratic Socialists, Indigenous resistance, Students for a Democratic Society, Pandos, Utah Against Police Brutality, and others. There were also many individuals who came to show solidarity, with some being armed. Observing the growing crowd of demonstrators, one protestor, Josh Straugther said, “Being here is amazing, because… this is not the most black city out here.”

Read the full article published by Utah Stories!!

JAIL CITY ROCKERS


The sincerity of Jail City Rockers stands out because they are approachable and always humble—traits one should expect from true punk rock n’ rollers. Jail City Rockers are the brothers Andrew and Gabe Bonilla, Aron Mikkelsen and the newly joined Gabey Spent, formerly of Duane Peters Gunfight. Jail City Rockers formed from the ashes of the Bonilla brothers’ prior band, Nobody’s Heroes, and for the last four years, they have tirelessly graced the Wasatch Front with their own design of roots-driven rebel rock. “I told Gabe when we started this band, ‘I have a huge London Calling poster on my wall,’ and I pointed at that and said, ‘Gabe, this is what I want to do,’” says Andrew. “I want to be a rock n’ roll band. I want to be a punk band. I want to have hints of old traditional ska music, early Motown, early soul—which is kind of what we grew up on. We wanted to take that and blend it all into one band.” Speaking further on the subject, Gabe adds, “We’re definitely not good enough to be a Motown band, so we do it our way.” Additional influences that have helped shape Jail City Rockers include a wide variety of musical genres such as 1980s hardcore, Blue Beat Jamaican rocksteady, ’50s rock n’ roll and, of course, 1970s punk. The result is true rock n’ roll with nods toward a Clash-inspired roots-rhythm rebel sound.
,br> Dig the full article on Ogden darlings Jail City Rockers published @SLUG Magazine!!