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Bands are Buzzing at The Beehive Social Club

Photos by Mike Jones

For almost 10 years, Konrad Keele has operated an all-ages venue for Utah’s punk, hardcore and Ska communities. Standing at about 6’ 2”, Keele dresses casually-not with studs and bristles- and speaks with a reserved, but confident tone. Since 2016, he has owned and operated The Beehive Social Club, located on 666 South and State Street. He seeks to empower his community and friends by providing access to music through his venues. Speaking of his own transformative experiences, Keele says, “I’ve been changed through music. My politics are directly affected by the bands I listen to — my diet, my habits, my whole lifestyle.”

Check out the full article on Konrade Keele and The Beehive Social Club published @ Utah Stories!!

TOP 5 ALBUMS OF 2018

Every year I come out with a little list of albums that have been released throughout the year. This list isn’t meant as a competition. During the turbulent and transformative year of 2018, I have found myself constantly re-listening to these gems. They are remarkable works of very talented artists. All articles were published exclusively here at nixbeat.com, at Utah Stories, SLUG Magazine or Heatwave Magazine. Enjoy and Happy New Year!

Reverand Beatman and Nicole Izobel Garcia — Baile Bruja Muerto  (2018) “Beat-Man says ““Everybody that comes to one of our shows will be saved and converted.” Audiences can expect to hear tracks like “Come Back Lord” and “Black Metal.” “Come Back Lord” is upbeat track with a pronounced organ sound. It’s the kind of tune that will evoke the dancefloor to shutter. In contrast “Black Metal” is a kind of dark bluesy ballad. A warning though, this performance is not for the faint hearted, but there will never be anything else quite like it. ”

The Speedways — Just Another Regular Summer ( 05.27.2018 )
“This album was composed by Mathew Julian with the addition of Dec Burns on the drums
. Just Another Regular Summer captures the nostalgic essence of Joey Ramone’s longing vocals by twisting it with an attitude worthy of the Exploding Hearts and infusing it with the hopeless romantic nature of Protex and the Speedies. The tracks on Just Another Regular Summer are performed with a kind of painful restraint but maintains a cool and passionate feeling. This is especially evident with the track “Reunion In The Rain.”

The Revox — In Mono (09.14.2018)
“All the way from Switzerland, The Revox embody the voracious spirit of sounds meant for the wild and untamed. They celebrate a style mixing the essence of the raucous Black Lips twisted with The Chesterfield Kings, but emphasizing the moody but primitive nature of Los Saicos. Their new record In Mono exemplifies their talent to blast out raw garage punk stompers through hi energy tunes of desperate rock n’ roll with dashes of fuzzed out psychedelia.”

Fashionism — Smash Singles LP (04.2018)   The songs found within the grooves of the Smash Singles LP celebrate the clever nature could have been heard by The Boys or even by the sharp wit of The Adverts. This is largely thanks to vocalist Jeffery McCloy masterful weaving of punchy lyrics that tell a story with a sound that combines the infectious nature of Bay City Rollers like glam rock meeting the sensibilities of The Purple Hearts. “

Los Yayaz — Born Dead ( 05.12.2018)
“Los YaYaz have blazed through the Salt Lake City music scene by combining the wild and primitive style of Los Yetis and Los Saicos with the intensity of The Sonics. This new record maintains their iconic blended style with all the trappings of repressed teenage angst and longing desperation. Their delivery is raw and if I didn’t know better I would have sworn Born Dead was some long lost garage-punk- unknown. “

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Honorary Top 5 Mentions

  1. Faz Waltz — Double Decker (03.21.2018)
  2. The Blankz— White Baby/Sissy Glue (07.13.2018)
  3. The Terror Surfs — Mutant Surfin’ Trash  (02.23.2018)
  4. Reverend Beat Man — Blues Trash  (04.05.2018)
  5. Wild Evel and The Trash Bones — Digging My Grave (11.24.2017)

Mortigi Tempo — Spread The Disease

Mortigi Tempo
Spread The Disease
Self-Released
August 23rd, 2018

Mortigi Tempo produced something delightfully refreshing and different with their new album. It’s called Spread The Disease. After a pint it’s the kind of music that leaves an infectiously subversive impression. Stylistically, Mortigi Temp seem to touch a kind of indie-rock twirling with elements of industrial influencing post punk that somehow mixes into a gothic feeling ensemble. To be sure, it’s the sort of music that celebrates the ominous while invoking a surrender to move about like an idiot after too manic inducing substances.

Spread The Disease firmly grabs a hold of it’s listener and electrifies them to dance. This is evident within only listening to the first few seconds of the first track “Spread The Disease.”  This song starts off with an intro featuring a politically charged PSA on the dangers of complacent boredom courtesy of a prerecorded reading of Wallace Shawn’s “My Dinner With Andre.” It’s dark and warms up for a wild post punky ride of a tune with a strong back beat and erry synth. Think of Love and Rockets with a dash of Killing Joke infused with HMLTD.

The entirety of Spread The Disease is like a wild ride. “Chrome Plated Cookies” breaks off the previous tracks path into the realm of something groovy and indie. While “Jesse Wants To Steal” breaks into a sound invoking nostalgia for early noughties alternative rock.

Further down the track listing each additional tune comes across with a stark difference from that of before. By the end, this albums concluding track “Aftermath” leaves one feeling a bit empty inside—not unlike the commercial driven culture that the first track warns against.   

From start to finish Spread The Disease is brilliant. It pulls it’s listener through the depths of being warned against a rampant self-contented culture. It it is done so in a superbly entertaining way and performed with music that begins by begging one to dance and then to gradually succumb to the mind numbing effects of sounds found in droning of Neo-psychedelia.  

MortigiTempo have a unique talent and they superbly demonstrate it through a diversity in style that truly shows offs the majesty of their skill. As a whole Spread The Disease is well worth the listen and it’ll be interesting to see what MortigiTempo comes out with next. Be sure to watch them closely.

The Revox — In Mono

The Revox
In Mono
Soundflat Records
September 14, 2018

All the way from Switzerland, The Revox embody the voracious spirit of sounds meant for the wild and untamed. They celebrate a style mixing the essence of the raucous Black Lips twisted with The Chesterfield Kings, but emphasizing the moody but primitive nature of Los Saicos. Their new record In Mono exemplifies their talent to blast out raw garage punk stompers through hi energy tunes of desperate rock n’ roll with dashes of fuzzed out psychedelia.

In Mono is an album that immediately grabs the unwary listener’s attention by the extremities and holds tight. The opening track “Father In Low” boasts a savage sound demanding listeners move around like bewitched dolls. This song brilliantly blends essential elements of snotty punk with a certain maddening defiance. As a far as 1960’s revivalist garage rock goes, this track nails it and cements what is to be found within In Mono.

Another top tune is “Gloria Stompers.” This one easily rips from the riffs of the iconic Van Morisons “Gloria.” It’s a song stepped in a moody garage punk with a definitive attitude. While the instrumentals borrow heavily from “Gloria” it’s a tune that pays homage rather than imitation. Another familiar song on In Mono is the cover of The Leave’s “Hey Joe.” Like Gloria Stompers, The Revox makes a clear nod to the legendary time of the 1960’s, and in doing so it does the garage punk legacy justice.

The real magic on this album is the tune “Never Ending Trip” It’s got a strong build up to a fuzzed out guitar riffs that give way to the infectious chorus of “I’m freaking out!” “Never Ending Trip” could easily be found in a Back From The Grave compilation, if it wasn’t a modern tune.  This track is a personal favorite from In Mono. It’s not only catchy as hell, but this song truly demonstrates The Revox’s natural ability to hold their own in the expanse of garage punk music. To not find oneself singing along to “Never Ending Trip” might warrant a keen head examination.

The Revox truly out do themselves with their new record. Compared to their recent single release on Voodoo Rhythm Recordings, In Mono is a little more cleaned up, but that doesn’t hamper their impressive style in the slightest.  In Mono is a fantastic album and If one did not consider it as a worthy part of their record collection, that oversight would be a clear indication of a drastic mistake. So beware, get this record and play this one loud enough to upset the neighbors. You’ll be glad you did.

Salt Lake’s Urban Indian Center

Photos by Braden Latimer.

Since 1971 the Urban Indian Center has provided essential support and resources to the Salt Lake Valley’s Native population. This is done by offering a kind of haven and cultural hub away from the hectic pace of urban life. Co-Founder of the Utah League of American Voters, Moroni Benally, says, “Census wise, there’s over 6,000 representing some 250 plus tribal nations. So it’s fairly diverse, but there’s a predominant presence of Navajo.”

Originally the Urban Indian Center was home to several other minority organizations. However, over time those in the Pacific Islander and Latino communities have found their own headquarters. Former Executive Director Anthony Guzman says, “We still try to make ourselves as available to everybody as we can.”

Check out the full article published by Utah Stories!!

The Boys Ranch

(L–R) Wren Kennedy, Samantha Dickens, Denney Fuller, Ian Francis and Conor Flynn. Photo: Matthew Hunter

On Nov. 16, SLUG Magazine presents SLUG Localized featuring The Boys Ranch, The Poppees and Say Hey at Urban Lounge. This evening will celebrate some of Utah’s finest surf, pop and rock n’ roll acts. Get ready to twist, shout and do the barracuda. SLUG Localized is sponsored by Uinta Brewing, High West Distillery, KRCL 90.9 FM and Spilt Ink SLC.

The Boys Ranch were founded by Denney Fuller and feature the talents of Wren Kennedy, Samantha Dickens, Conor Flynn and Ian Francis. Prior to forming the group, Fuller performed for years—including with Joshy Soul and The Cool—and has always carried a deep affinity for rock n’ roll, most notably for songs such as Sam The Sham and The Pharaohs’ “Wooly Bully” and The Ventures’ “Wipe Out.” Feeling electrified by these tunes, Fuller says, “They make me wanna get wild and run around the house.”

As a group, The Boys Ranch share a wide range of influences. Everything from The Clash to bossa nova, from Prince to The Beatles whet their creative appetites. Fuller says, “I really dig early rock n’ roll as well. Del Shannon, Roy Orbison, Bo Diddley and Little Richard are just great.” However, the band that prominently stands out for The Boys Ranch are The Kinks. “They are the blue-collar Beatles, in my opinion,” says Fuller. “They just have way too many dang good songs, and played exactly the way they wanted to play.”

Dig the full article on The Boys Ranch published by SLUG Magazine!!

The Poppees

(L–R) Cody Rigby, Moo Rudolph, Sully Swoboda, Andres Mitchell and Michael Cuenco. Photo: Matthew Hunter

On Nov. 16, SLUG Magazine presents SLUG Localized featuring The Boys Ranch, The Poppees and Say Hey at Urban Lounge. This evening will celebrate some of Utah’s finest surf, pop and rock n’ roll acts. Get ready to twist, shout and do the barracuda. SLUG Localized is sponsored by Uinta Brewing, High West Distillery, KRCL 90.9 FM and Spilt Ink SLC.

The Poppees were born out of the withering petals of The Artificial Flower Company and blossomed as a band refreshed, renewed but familiar to the senses. They breathe life into a new era of jangly indie rock by evoking a concoction of 1960s harmonious Monkees-esque tunes that warm their listeners with a fuzzy daze of sweetened-eggnog-induced psychedelia. Their music is perfect for a tonic lounge or dimly lit speakeasy. They are, however, not to be confused with the 1970s power pop group of the same name. These Poppees are Andres Mitchell, Cody Rigby, Moo Rudolph, Sully Swoboda and Michael Cuenco. Rigby says, “Like a plant that grows and loses its leaves, we, too, grew into what we are now.”

Read the full article on The Poppee’s published by SLUG Magazine!!

Village Cobbler Shoe Repair: These Boots Are Made for Walking

Cobbler Troy Morgan. Photos by Bryan Butterfield : imageandfilm.com

Village Cobbler Shoe Repair has long been a staple in the Salt Lake Valley. Since 1968, they have breathed renewed life into countless shoes needing a little or a lot of love. This shop is run by the Morgan family since it was founded by Rob Morgan, and is now managed by his son, Troy Morgan. Troy says, “I didn’t have much of a choice when I started working there as a teenager. I learned the craft from my dad. He’s the best in the business, so I feel very lucky.”

Read the full article about Village Cobbler Shoe Repair published by Utah Stories!!

 

Informed Voting

November 6 , 2018 marks the United States midterm elections. Across the nation people from all walks of life will take to the ballot boxes to vote for their representatives and decide the course of the country. Consequences for not voting can be devastating. Participation is imperative. “ I think voting is a large part of what it means to be civically engaged in America,” says Alex Cragun Executive Director of The Utah Democratic Party. “I don’t want to say if you don’t show up and vote you don’t have a right to complain — I don’t believe in that. But if you don’t show up and vote, you’re surrendering your power to those are more eager and interested in claiming it.

Read the full article published at Utah Stories!